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Effects of an intradialytic resistance training programme on physical function: A prospective stepped-wedge randomized controlled trial

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Version 2 2024-06-03, 19:53
Version 1 2016-01-12, 09:42
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 19:53 authored by PN Bennett, Steve FraserSteve Fraser, R Barnard, T Haines, C Ockerby, Maryann StreetMaryann Street, WC Wang, Robin DalyRobin Daly
BACKGROUND: Intradialytic exercise programmes are important because of the deterioration in physical function that occurs in people receiving haemodialysis. Unfortunately, exercise programmes are rarely sustained in haemodialysis clinics. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a sustainable resistance exercise programme on the physical function of people receiving haemodialysis. METHODS: A total of 171 participants from 15 community satellite haemodialysis clinics performed progressive resistance training using resistance elastic bands in a seated position during the first hour of haemodialysis treatment. We used a stepped-wedge design of three groups, each containing five randomly allocated cluster units allocated to an intervention of 12, 24 or 36 weeks. The primary outcome measure was objective physical function measured by the 30-s sit-to-stand (STS) test, the 8-foot timed up and go (TUG) test and the four-square step test. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life, involvement in community activity, blood pressure and self-reported falls. RESULTS: Exercise training led to significant improvements in physical function as measured by STS and TUG. There was a significant average downward change (β = -1.59, P < 0.01) before the intervention and a significant upward change after the intervention (β = 0.38, P < 0.01) for the 30-s STS with a similar pattern noted for the TUG. CONCLUSION: Intradialytic resistance training can improve the physical function of people receiving dialysis.

History

Journal

Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

Volume

31

Pagination

1302-1309

Location

England

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

0931-0509

eISSN

1460-2385

Language

English

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2015, The Author

Issue

8

Publisher

OXFORD UNIV PRESS