File(s) under permanent embargo

Effects of plasma treatment of wool on the uptake of sulfonated dyes with different hydrophobic properties

journal contribution
posted on 2010-03-01, 00:00 authored by Maryam NaebeMaryam Naebe, Peter Cookson, John Rippon, R Brady, Xungai WangXungai Wang
A wool fabric has been subjected to an atmospheric-pressure treatment with a helium plasma for 30 seconds. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry confirmed removal of the covalently-bound fatty acid layer (F-layer) from the surface of the wool fibers, resulting in exposure of the underlying, hydrophilic protein material. Dye uptake experiments were carried out at 50 ºC to evaluate the effects of plasma on the rate of dye uptake by the fiber surface, as well as give an indication of the adsorption characteristics in the early stages of a typical dyeing cycle. The dyes used were typical, sulfonated wool dyes with a range of hydrophobic characteristics, as determined by their partitioning behavior between water and n-butanol. No significant effects of plasma on the rate of dye adsorption were observed with relatively hydrophobic dyes. In contrast, the relatively hydrophilic dyes were adsorbed more rapidly (and uniformly) by the plasma-treated fabric. It was concluded that adsorption of hydrophobic dyes on plasma-treated wool was influenced by hydrophobic interactions, whereas electrostatic effects predominated for dyes of more hydrophilic character. On heating the dyebath to 90 ºC in order to achieve fiber penetration, no significant effect of the plasma treatment on the extent of uptake or levelness of a relatively hydrophilic dye was observed as equilibrium conditions were approached.

History

Journal

Textile research journal

Volume

80

Issue

4

Pagination

312 - 324

Publisher

Sage Publications

Location

London, England

ISSN

0040-5175

eISSN

1746-7748

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2009, Sage Publications