File(s) under permanent embargo

Effects of starting strategy on 5-min cycling time-trial performance

journal contribution
posted on 01.09.2009, 00:00 authored by Brad AisbettBrad Aisbett, P Le Rossignol, G McConell, C Abbiss, Rod SnowRod Snow
The importance of pacing for middle-distance performance is well recognized, yet previous research has produced equivocal results. Twenty-six trained male cyclists ( V O2peak 62.8+5.9 ml ·kg-1 · min-1· maximal aerobic power output 340+43 W; mean+s) performed three cycling time-trials where the total external work (102.7+13.7 kJ) for each trial was identical to the best of two 5-min habituation trials. Markers of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism were assessed in 12 participants. Power output during the first quarter of the time-trials was fixed to control external mechanical work done (25.7+3.4 kJ) and induce fast-, even-, and slow-starting strategies (60, 75, and 90 s, respectively). Finishing times for the fast-start time-trial (4:53+0:11 min:s) were shorter than for the even-start (5:04+0:11 min:s; 95% CI=5 to 18 s, effect size=0.65, P 50.001) and slow-start time-trial (5:09+0:11 min:s; 95% CI=7 to 24 s, effect size=1.00, P 50.001). Mean VO2 during the fast-start trials (4.31+0.51 litres · min-1) was 0.18+0.19 litres · min-1 (95% CI=0.07 to 0.30 litres · min-1, effect size=0.94, P =0.003) higher than the even- and 0.18+0.20 litres · min-1 (95% CI=0.5 to 0.30 litres · min-1, effect size=0.86, P =0.007) higher than the slow-start time-trial. Oxygen deficit was greatest during the first quarter of the fast-start trial but was lower than the even- and slow-start trials during the second quarter of the trial. Blood lactate and pH were similar between the three trials. In conclusion, performance during a 5-min cycling time-trial was improved with the adoption of a fast- rather than an even- or slow-starting strategy.

History

Journal

Journal of sports sciences

Volume

27

Issue

11

Pagination

1201 - 1209

Publisher

Routledge

Location

London, England

ISSN

0264-0414

eISSN

1466-447X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2009, Taylor & Francis