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Emergency nurses’ activity levels across rotating shifts

journal contribution
posted on 01.09.2020, 00:00 authored by Stephanie Chappel, Brad AisbettBrad Aisbett, Julie ConsidineJulie Considine, Nicky RidgersNicky Ridgers
Background: Emergency nurses work consecutive, rotating shift patterns. However, how their occupational physical activity levels are associated between these shifts is unknown. This study aimed to examine the associations between emergency nurses’ time spent in different activity levels across one shift and the following day's shift. Methods: Fifty emergency nurses (45 female, five male) wore an ActiGraph accelerometer and completed work and sleep diaries across four weeks in 2018. A sub-sample (n = 42) also wore an activPAL inclinometer. Time spent sedentary, physically active, and in postural positions was determined. Multi-level analyses examined associations between one shift and the following day's shift. Results: Additional time spent sedentary and in light-intensity physical activity during the first shift was associated with more time spent being physically active in the following day's shift for all rotations except back-to-back night shifts. However, additional time spent engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity during the first shift was associated with less time spent physically active in the following day's shift for afternoon-morning and morning-afternoon rotations. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that shift sequences may impact emergency nurses’ physical activity across shifts. Future research should identify the strategies emergency nurses use to maintain activity levels between shifts.

History

Journal

Australasian emergency care

Volume

23

Issue

3

Pagination

203 - 210

Publisher

Elsevier

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ISSN

2589-1375

eISSN

2588-994X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal