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Evaluation of an alcohol intervention training program for nurses in rural Australia

journal contribution
posted on 01.01.2013, 00:00 authored by David MellorDavid Mellor, M McCabe, L Ricciardelli, Susan BrumbySusan Brumby, Alex Head, C Mercer-Grant, Alison KennedyAlison Kennedy
Aim: This paper reports on the development, implementation and evaluation of the Alcohol Intervention Training Program (AITP) designed to enhance nurses’ capacity to work with farming men and women who misuse alcohol.

Background: In rural and regional areas where alcohol-related behaviours and problems are relatively elevated, nurses may be the key health professionals dealing with individuals who misuse alcohol. However, they are often ill-equipped to do this, have low confidence in their ability to do so, and perceive numerous barriers. Training is required for these nurses.

Methods: We developed the AITP to enhance nurses’ capacity to work with people with alcohol-related problems. The data were collected during 2010. An intervention group of 15 rural nurses completed the AITP. Nurses’ perceived barriers, attitudes, and perceived performance in working with clients with alcohol problems, and the frequency of engaging with this client group were evaluated. Scores on these measures were compared to those of a control group of 17 nurses’ pre-treatment, post-treatment and at 3-month follow-up.

Results: Participation in the AITP resulted in initial improvements in attitudes to working with alcohol problems, but no change in perceived barriers to doing so. The level of engagement with clients having alcohol-related problems increased, as did perceptions of work performance.

Conclusion: The AITP enhances the ability of rural nurses to address the alcohol and associated health issues of clients in rural and regional areas. However, the program needs refinement and further evaluation.

History

Journal

Journal of research in nursing

Volume

18

Issue

6

Pagination

561 - 575

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Location

London, England

ISSN

1744-9871

eISSN

1744-988X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal