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Evaluation of the design, conduct and reporting of randomised controlled trials in the haemodialysis population: a scoping review and interview study

Version 2 2024-06-03, 16:21
Version 1 2022-05-18, 09:51
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 16:21 authored by P Kaushal, SF Adenwalla, CJ Lightfoot, DS March, LJ Gray, JO Burton
BACKGROUND: Fewer trials are conducted in nephrology than any other specialty, often failing to recruit to target, resulting in unclear evidence affecting translation to clinical practice. This mixed-methods study aims to provide guidance for designing and reporting future randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the haemodialysis population. METHOD: A scoping review was conducted. Five databases (MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov) were searched for RCTs published between 2013 and 2019 involving prevalent adult haemodialysis patients. Reporting of sample size, recruitment, retention and statistical significance of primary outcome were assessed. Face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted with individuals from a single centre during dialysis sessions. Interviews were analysed thematically. RESULTS: Of 786 RCTs identified, 636 (80.9%) were parallel-group, 139 (17.7%) were crossover and 11 (1.4%) were cluster (including one stepped-wedge) design. Sample size justification was reported in 73.1%, 53.8% and 45.5% of parallel-group, crossover and cluster trials, respectively.Target recruitment was achieved by 45.5% of cluster, 53.8% of crossover and 57.7% of parallel-group trials with patient retention at 75.6%, 83.1% and 87.8%, respectively. Primary outcome reached statistical significance in 81.8% of cluster trials, 69.2% of parallel-group and 38.5% of crossover trials.Themes identified from individual interviews: perceptions of the convenience of trial participation; group allocation; perceptions of the benefits and adverse effects of taking part in clinical trials. CONCLUSION: The recruitment and reporting of RCTs involving people on haemodialysis could be improved. Involvement of all stakeholders and especially participants in the trial design process may address issues around participant burden and ultimately improve the evidence base for clinical practice.

History

Journal

BMJ open

Volume

12

Article number

e058368

Pagination

1-12

Location

London, Eng.

eISSN

2044-6055

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

3

Publisher

BMJ

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