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Everyday cognitive functioning in cardiac patients: Relationships between self-report, report of a significant other and cognitive test performance

journal contribution
posted on 2010-01-01, 00:00 authored by P C Elliott, G Smith, C S Ernest, B M Murphy, M U C Worcester, R O Higgins, Michael Le GrandeMichael Le Grande, A J Goble, D Andrewes, J Tatoulis
Candidates for cardiac bypass surgery often experience cognitive decline. Such decline is likely to affect their everyday cognitive functioning. The aim of the present study was to compare cardiac patients' ratings of their everyday cognitive functioning against significant others' ratings and selected neuropsychological tests. Sixty-nine patients completed a battery of standardised cognitive tests. Patients and significant others also completed the Everyday Function Questionnaire independently of each other. Patient and significant other ratings of patients' everyday cognitive difficulties were found to be similar. Despite the similarities in ratings of difficulties, some everyday cognitive tasks were attributed to different processes. Patients' and significant others' ratings were most closely associated with the neuropsychological test of visual memory. Tests of the patients' verbal memory and fluency were only related to significant others' ratings. Test scores of attention and planning were largely unrelated to ratings by either patients or their significant others. © 2009 Psychology Press.

History

Journal

Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition

Volume

17

Issue

1

Pagination

71 - 88

ISSN

1382-5585

eISSN

1744-4128

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal