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Experiences of engagement in occupations and assertive outreach services

journal contribution
posted on 2009-11-01, 00:00 authored by Danielle HitchDanielle Hitch
Aim: The purpose of this study was to describe the experience and meaning of engagement for staff and clients of assertive outreach teams.
Method: Interpretative phenomenological analysis was selected for its flexibility and transparency. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews from a sample of five client and five staff participants (n = 10). The interviews were analysed idiographically, inductively and interrogatively.
Findings: Four themes identified by both staff and client participants emerged: engagement as an interpersonal relationship, engagement in and through time, enabling and disabling factors and engagement in occupation. In addition, clients developed a theme around engagement as a means to self-actualisation. Staff also raised a specific theme around the role of engagement in mental health services.
Conclusion: Staff and clients experienced engagement in broadly similar ways, but with differing emphases. Although all participants described it as both an invisible 'means' and a visible 'end', the staff related engagement only to mental health services whereas the clients experienced it in the context of both mental health services and occupations.
Relevance: This study is relevant to all occupational therapists who work with people experiencing mental health problems.

History

Journal

British journal of occupational therapy

Volume

72

Issue

11

Pagination

482 - 490

Publisher

College of Occupational Therapists

Location

London, England

ISSN

0308-0226

eISSN

1477-6006

Language

eng

Notes

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Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal; C Journal article

Copyright notice

2009, College of Occupational Therapists

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