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Exploring the associations between the perception of water scarcity and support for alternative potable water sources

Version 3 2024-06-19, 17:58
Version 2 2024-06-03, 15:27
Version 1 2023-04-05, 04:53
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-19, 17:58 authored by C Semasinghe, Santosh JatranaSantosh Jatrana, Tanya KingTanya King
This study examines the association between the perception of water scarcity and support for alternative water sources in general, and specifically desalination and recycled water. It also examines the mediating role that perception of climate change has on the aforementioned association. A 46-item survey (n = 588) was conducted in the Geelong region of Australia. Logistic regression was used to determine the independent association between perceived water scarcity and socio-demographic factors, with support for alternative water sources, desalination and recycled water. 82% of respondents supported undefined ‘alternative water sources’. However, support for specific alternatives was lower (desalination: 65%; recycled water: 40.3%). Perception of water scarcity was significantly associated with increased odds of support for alternative water sources (OR 1.94, 95% CI: 1.25–3.00) and support for recycled water (OR 2.32, 95% CI: 1.68–3.31). There was no significant relationship between perception of water scarcity and support for desalination (OR 0.959 95% CI: 0.677–1.358). Climate change was found to mediate perceived water scarcity and support for alternative sources (OR 1.360, 95% CI: 0.841–2.198). The mediation of the relationship between perceived water scarcity and support for recycled water by climate change was not strong. These results facilitate enhanced community engagement strategies.

History

Journal

PLoS ONE

Volume

18

Article number

e0283245

Pagination

1-14

Location

San Francisco, Calif.

ISSN

1932-6203

eISSN

1932-6203

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Editor/Contributor(s)

Odetokun IA

Issue

3

Publisher

PLoS

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