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Family history of non-communicable diseases and associations with weight and movement behaviours in Australian school-aged children: A prospective study

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posted on 03.11.2020, 00:00 authored by Katherine DowningKatherine Downing, Kylie HeskethKylie Hesketh, Anna TimperioAnna Timperio, Jo SalmonJo Salmon, K Moss, G Mishra
Objective: To assess differences in weight status and movement behaviour guideline compliance among children aged 5–12 years with and without a family history of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Design: Prospective. Setting and participants: Women born between 1973 and 1978 were recruited to the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH) via the database of the Health Insurance Commission (now Medicare; Australia’s universal health insurance scheme). In 2016–2017, women in that cohort were invited to participate in the Mothers and their Children’s Health Study and reported on their three youngest children (aged <13 years). Data from children aged 5–12 years (n=4416) were analysed. Measures: Mothers reported their children’s height and weight, used to calculate body mass index (kg/m2), physical activity, screen time and sleep. In the 2015 ALSWH Survey, women reported diagnoses and family history of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and hypertension. Logistic regression models determined differences between outcomes for children with and without a family history of NCDs. Results: Boys with a family history of type 2 diabetes had 30% (95% CI: 0.51%–0.97%) and 43% lower odds (95% CI: 0.37%–0.88%) of meeting the sleep and combined guidelines, respectively, and 40% higher odds (95% CI: 1.01%– 1.95%) of being overweight/obese. Girls with a family history of hypertension had 27% lower odds (95% CI: 0.57%–0.93%) of meeting the screen time guidelines. No associations were observed for family history of heart disease. Conclusions: Children who have a family history of type 2 diabetes and hypertension may be at risk of poorer health behaviours from a young age. Mothers with a diagnosis or a family history of these NCDs may need additional support to help their children develop healthy movement behaviours and maintain healthy weight.

History

Journal

BMJ Open

Volume

10

Issue

11

Article number

e038789

Pagination

1 - 8

Publisher

BMJ

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

2044-6055

eISSN

2044-6055

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2020, The Authors