Deakin University
Browse
feyissa-fertilityamongwomenliving-2020.pdf (387.94 kB)

Fertility among women living with HIV in western Ethiopia and its implications for prevention of vertical transmission: a cross-sectional study

Download (387.94 kB)
Version 3 2024-06-19, 08:13
Version 2 2024-06-06, 00:48
Version 1 2022-01-19, 10:09
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-19, 08:13 authored by Tesfaye FeyissaTesfaye Feyissa, ML Harris, PM Forder, D Loxton
ObjectiveThis study aimed to examine fertility (live births) in the last 3 years and its associated factors among women living with HIV (WLHIV) in western Ethiopia .DesignParticipants were recruited into a cross-sectional survey using systematic sampling.SettingsFour healthcare facilities in western Ethiopia were included.ParticipantsEligible participants were WLHIV of reproductive age (15–49 years) from western Ethiopia who found out about their HIV-positive status more than 3 years ago (N=866).Primary outcome measuresThe fertility (live births) of HIV-positive women in the last 3 years was surveyed using face-to-face interviews (March–June 2018). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine factors influencing fertility in the last 3 years.ResultsA total of 108 (12.5%) HIV-positive women gave birth to 121 live children in the last 3 years. Of these births, 18.2% were reported as mistimed at conception, while 26.4% were reported as unwanted. Of the live births, 8.3% ended in death. Of the 76 (62.8%) children with known HIV status born to HIV-positive women in the last 3 years, 7.9% were HIV-positive. In terms of predictors of fertility, women aged 15–24 years (adjusted OR (AOR) 2.72; 95% CI 1.14 to 6.49) and 25–34 years (AOR 4.34; 95% CI 2.61 to 7.21) had increased odds of fertility compared with women aged 35–49 years. Women using antiretroviral therapy (ART) for less than 5 years were more likely to have given birth in the last 3 years compared with those using ART for 10 years or more (AOR 2.96; 95% CI 1.19 to 7.36), even after controlling for age.ConclusionsWLHIV in Ethiopia are having children and so it is imperative that safe conception strategies are readily available as well as support to reduce HIV-related risks for children born to these mothers. Strengthening reproductive health services for HIV-positive women in order to achieve their family planning goals is therefore important.

History

Journal

BMJ open

Volume

10

Article number

ARTN e036391

Pagination

e036391-

Location

England

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

2044-6055

eISSN

2044-6055

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

8

Publisher

BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP