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Fever in returned travelers: Review of hospital admissions for a 3-year period

journal contribution
posted on 2001-09-01, 00:00 authored by Daniel O'Brien, S Tobin, G V Brown, J Torresi
We reviewed 232 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary-care hospital under the care of an infectious diseases unit for management of febrile illness acquired overseas. A total of 53% presented to hospital within 1 week of return and 96% within 6 months. Malaria was the most common diagnosis (27% of patients), followed by respiratory tract infection (24%), gastroenteritis (14%), dengue fever (8%), and bacterial pneumonia (6%). Pretravel vaccination may have prevented a number of admissions, including influenza (n = 11), typhoid fever (n = 8) and hepatitis A (n = 6). Compared to those who had not traveled to Africa, those who had were 6 times more likely to present with falciparum than nonfalciparum malaria. An itinerary that included Asia was associated with a 13-fold increased risk of dengue, but a lower risk of malaria. Palpable splenomegaly was associated with an 8-fold risk of malaria and hepatomegaly with a 4-fold risk of malaria. As a cause of fever, bacterial pneumonia was ≥5 times more likely in those who were aged >40 years.

History

Journal

Clinical Infectious Diseases

Volume

33

Issue

5

Pagination

603 - 609

ISSN

1058-4838

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