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Food-based social enterprises and asylum seekers: the food justice truck

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journal contribution
posted on 2018-06-12, 00:00 authored by Fiona McKayFiona McKay, Kehla LippiKehla Lippi, Matthew DunnMatthew Dunn, Bronte Haines, Rebecca LindbergRebecca Lindberg
People seeking asylum in high-income countries are vulnerable to food insecurity due to limited opportunities for social and economic participation. While charity organizations have long sought to provide food aid to those in need, the increasing number of people seeking this assistance requires alternatives. Using a case study approach, this research investigates The Food Justice Truck, which is a social enterprise designed to provide low cost, nutritious food to people seeking asylum with an aim to reduce the food insecurity burden. Twenty-seven people seeking asylum completed a structured interview (n = 15) or a semi-structured interview (n = 12). The majority of participants were female (n = 20) with an average age of 38.3 years (Standard Deviation (SD) 7.3; range 30⁻59) and over half were from Iran (n = 16, 59.2%) with most holding a temporary visa to stay in Australia (n = 15, 55.5%). Two key findings were identified including the fact that the FJT is at risk of creating and perpetuating a power imbalance. However, as a social setting, the FJT has the potential to promote and enable a social connection and create a positive experience. This research study adds valuable information to the literature by providing research on one alternative to traditional food aid. It was found that alternatives to traditional food aid may play a role in reducing the food security burden.

History

Journal

Nutrients

Volume

10

Issue

6

Article number

756

Pagination

1 - 10

Publisher

MDPI

Location

Basel, Switzerland

eISSN

2072-6643

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, the authors