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Gender differences in prevalence and associations between cognitive symptoms and suicidal ideation in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder: findings from the Chinese NSSD study

Version 2 2024-06-18, 23:12
Version 1 2024-03-21, 02:56
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-18, 23:12 authored by Ruizhi Mao, Chenglei Wang, Lvchun Cui, David MellorDavid Mellor, Zhiguo Wu, Yiru Fang
Abstract Background This study aimed to explore gender differences in associations between cognitive symptoms and suicidal ideation (SI) among patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods We recruited 1222 patients with recurrent MDD from the National Survey on Symptomatology of Depression (NSSD), a survey designed to investigate the symptoms experienced during current major depressive episodes in China. A four-point Likert questionnaire was used to assess the frequency of cognitive symptoms and SI in the past two weeks. Results Gender differences in clinical features and cognitive symptoms of participants with recurrent MDD were found. Specifically, male patients had a higher prevalence of memory loss, decreased verbal output, indecisiveness, and impaired interpersonal relationships, while female patients exhibited a higher prevalence of impaired social and occupational functioning (all P < 0.05). No significant difference in SI prevalence was found between male and female patients. The logistic regression analysis revealed that in male patients, SI was associated with indecisiveness and impaired interpersonal relationships. In female patients, reduced verbal output and impaired social and professional functions were also associated with SI in addition to the above-mentioned variables. Conclusion The findings of gender differences in associations between cognitive symptoms and SI highlight the need to carefully assess gender-specific cognitive predictors of SI in patients with recurrent MDD. This has further implications for more targeted prevention and treatment strategies for SI based on gender.

History

Journal

BMC Psychiatry

Volume

24

Article number

83

Pagination

1-10

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

1471-244X

eISSN

1471-244X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

1

Publisher

BMC