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Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor augments phagocytosis of mycobacterium avium complex by human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected monocytes/macrophages in vitro and in vivo

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posted on 2000-01-01, 00:00 authored by K Kedzierska, Johnson Mak, A Mijch, Ian Cooke, M Rainbird, S Roberts, G Paukovics, Damien Jolley, A Lopez, S Crowe
The role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection on the ability of human monocytes/macrophages to phagocytose Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in vivo and in vitro and the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on this function were investigated. By use of a flow cytometric assay to quantify phagocytosis, HIV-1 infection was found to impair the ability of monocyte-derived macrophages to phagocytose MAC in vitro, whereas GM-CSF significantly improved this defect. Phagocytosis was not altered by exposure to a mutant form of GM-CSF (E21R) binding only to the α chain of the GM-CSF receptor, suggesting that signaling by GM-CSF that leads to augmentation of phagocytosis is via the β chain of the receptor. In a patient with AIDS and disseminated multidrug-resistant MAC infection, GM-CSF treatment improved phagocytosis of MAC by peripheral blood monocytes and reduced bacteremia. These results imply that GM-CSF therapy may be useful in restoring antimycobacterial function by human monocytes/macrophages.

History

Journal

Journal of infectious diseases

Volume

181

Issue

1

Pagination

390 - 394

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Location

Cary, N. C.

ISSN

0022-1899

eISSN

1537-6613

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2000, Oxford University Press