Deakin University
Browse
hawkins-healthliteracy-2020.pdf (328.36 kB)

Health literacy is associated with health behaviors in students from vocational education and training schools: A danish population-based survey

Download (328.36 kB)
Version 2 2024-06-06, 02:31
Version 1 2020-02-07, 14:03
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-06, 02:31 authored by CD Klinker, A Aaby, LW Ringgaard, AV Hjort, M Hawkins, HT Maindal
© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Health literacy has been identified as an important and changeable intermediary determinant of health equity. Vocational education and training (VET) schools are a relevant setting for health behavior interventions seeking to diminish health inequities because many VET students come from low socio-economic status backgrounds. This study examines VET students’ health literacy and its association with health behavior based on a cross-sectional survey among 6119 students from 58 VET schools in Denmark in 2019. Two scales from the Health Literacy Questionnaire was used to assess domains of health literacy. Data were analyzed using Anova and logistic regression. The study population consisted of 43.4% female, and mean age was 24.2 years (range 15.8–64.0). The health literacy domain ‘Actively managing my health’ mean was 2.51, SD 0.66, and ‘Appraisal of health information’ mean was 2.37, SD 0.65. For both domains, being female, older age, attending the VET educational program Care-health-pedagogy, and higher self-rated health were associated with higher scale scores. In the adjusted analyses, lower scale scores were associated with less frequent breakfast, daily smoking, high-risk alcohol behavior and moderate-to-low physical activity. Our results show that low health literacy is associated with unhealthy behaviors in this population. Our results support and inform health literacy research and practice in educational institutions and services.

History

Journal

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Volume

17

Article number

671

Pagination

1-13

Location

Basel, Switzerland

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

1661-7827

eISSN

1660-4601

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

2

Publisher

Molecular Diversity Preservation International

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC