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History and attributes of selected Australian multi-tenure reserve networks

journal contribution
posted on 01.03.2005, 00:00 authored by James FitzsimonsJames Fitzsimons, Geoffrey WescottGeoffrey Wescott
The need for conservation planning across the landscape, regardless of tenure, is widely recognised. In Australia, attempts to coordinate the management of conservation lands are characterised by models such as Biosphere Reserves and Conservation Management Networks. This paper outlines the history behind the formation and development of three networks in Australia—the Bookmark Biosphere Reserve, the Gippsland Plains Conservation Management Network, and the Grassy Box Woodlands Conservation Management Network—with particular emphasis on the tenure and protection attributes of the various components within these networks. Despite having a similar number of components, the total area represented in the networks varied markedly. There were few similarities in the proportion of components of various tenures and protection mechanisms among networks. Composition of networks is likely to be strongly influenced by both historical factors (degree of subdivision, land ownership and remaining vegetation) and contemporary factors (aims of the network and willingness of landowners to participate). Continued research into both the evolution and the physical and social dynamics of multi-tenure reserve networks enables a better understanding of their operation, and will ultimately assist in improved conservation planning across the landscape.

History

Journal

Australian geographer

Volume

36

Issue

1

Pagination

75 - 93

Publisher

Routledge

Location

London, England

ISSN

0004-9182

eISSN

1465-3311

Language

eng

Notes

To obtain full text, please contact the author at jfitzsimons@tnc.org

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2005, Taylor & Francis