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How can managers reduce employee intention to quit?

journal contribution
posted on 01.01.2004, 00:00 authored by L Firth, David MellorDavid Mellor, Kathleen Moore, C Loquet
This paper reports on an investigation of the variables that may be predictive of intentions to leave a job, and tests a model that includes mediating variables. A total of 173 retail salespeople completed questionnaires measuring commitment to the organization for which they worked, job satisfaction, stress, supervisor support, locus of control, self-esteem, the perceived stressors in the job and their intention to quit. Path analysis was used to test the relationships hypothesized in the model. The majority of hypotheses were supported, with the variables included accounting for 52 per cent of the variance in intention to quit. Emotional support from supervisors and self-esteem mediated the impact of stressors on stress reactions, job satisfaction, commitment to the organization and intention to quit. It is suggested that to ameliorate intention to quit and in turn reduce turnover, managers need to actively monitor workloads, and the relationships between supervisors and subordinates in order to reduce and manage stress. Managers also need to monitor both the extrinsic and intrinsic sources of job satisfaction available to employees. These activities could assist in maintaining and increasing job satisfaction and commitment to the organization.


History

Journal

Journal of managerial psychology

Volume

19

Issue

2

Pagination

170 - 187

Publisher

Emerald Group Publishing

Location

Bingley, England

ISSN

0268-3946

eISSN

1758-7778

Language

eng

Notes

Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal; C Journal article

Copyright notice

2004, Emerald Group Publishing

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