Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

How long should a patron ban be: an examination of police-imposed barring notice records in Western Australia

Version 2 2024-06-02, 15:00
Version 1 2023-02-13, 03:44
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-02, 15:00 authored by Clare FarmerClare Farmer, Peter MillerPeter Miller, Nicholas TaylorNicholas Taylor, Ryan Baldwin
PurposePatron banning is widely used in response to disorderly behaviours in/around licensed venues, but there has been limited analysis of specific policies. This paper explores key findings in relation to police-imposed barring notices in Western Australia (WA).Design/methodology/approachWA Police provided de-identified data for 4,023 barring notices imposed between 2011 and 2020 and offender records for each recipient, to 30 June 2020. The data were analysed to identify patterns and trends in relation to ban length, recipient type and associated offending.FindingsMean ban lengths increased across the period (from 4.46 months in 2015 to 6.82 months in 2019). Longer initial bans (of 6–12 months) were associated with a lower likelihood of a subsequent ban – with each additional month associated with an 11.4% increase in the likelihood of not receiving a second ban. Across the dataset, some notable anomalies were identified for individuals categorised as prolific offenders.Originality/valueResearch examining the effects of patron banning is limited but, to date, has generally not supported presumptions of improved patron behaviour. WA adopts an individualised approach to barring notice lengths, following review of the incident and offender. The findings suggest that, while barring policy is appropriate, a number of operational refinements can help WA Police to optimise their behavioural effect/s.

History

Journal

Policing

Volume

46

Location

Bingley, Eng.

ISSN

1363-951X

eISSN

1758-695X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

2

Publisher

Emerald