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Illicit Substance Use and Harm in Young Adulthood: the Role of Substance Use in Close Relationships and Individual Social Skills

To examine illicit substance use across young adulthood and explore the extent to which social skills moderate the relationship between use and harm. 1,404 (761 women) from the Australian Temperament Project (est. 1983) participated across young adulthood (age 19–20, 23–24, and 27–28 years). Measures included self-reported illicit substance use/harm and social skills (i.e., assertion, empathy, responsibility, and self-control). The number and type of illicit substances used changed across young adulthood. Greater illicit substance use was associated with peer (OR = 4.96) and partner use (OR = 3.60). Moderation analyses suggested the risk relationship between the number of illicit substances used and harm was lower in those with high levels of assertion/self-control (ORassertion = 2.34, ORself-control = 2.60) compared to low levels (ORassertion = 4.43, ORself-control = 3.72). Evidence based programmes designed to strengthen individual social skills for young adults may play a role in protecting against the adverse effects of illicit substance use.

History

Journal

International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction

Pagination

1-15

Location

Berlin, Germany

ISSN

1557-1874

eISSN

1557-1882

Language

en

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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