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Impact of Embedding High-Intensity Interval Training in Schools and Sports Training on Children and Adolescent's Cardiometabolic Health and Health-Related Fitness: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Version 2 2024-06-03, 18:20
Version 1 2023-07-06, 01:04
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 18:20 authored by Narelle Eather, Mark Babic, Nicholas Riley, Sarah CostiganSarah Costigan, David R Lubans
Purpose: This systematic review aimed to identify studies evaluating the impact of high-intensity interval training when delivered in school and sports training. Methods: A systematic search of 10 databases (September 2019) identified 24 eligible studies (including children and/or adolescents 5–18 years and reporting cardiometabolic health and/or health-related fitness outcomes), assessed for quality using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool (version 2.0). Outcomes were synthesized using a random-effects meta-analysis, and potential moderators were explored (i.e., study duration, risk of bias, age, and deliverer/instructor). Results: Standardized mean difference for the effects of high-intensity interval training were significant for body mass index g = −0.27 (p < .001), cardiorespiratory fitness g = 0.27 (p < .001), lower body muscular fitness g = 0.49 (p = .005), and upper body muscular fitness g = 0.37 (p = .002); but not for blood pressure (p > .05). Risk of bias results were variable (low = 8, some concerns = 9, and high = 7). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that embedding high-intensity interval training in schools and sports training can facilitate improvements in some aspects of cardiometabolic health and fitness in children and adolescents.

History

Journal

Journal of Teaching in Physical Education

Volume

42

Pagination

243-255

Location

Champaign, Ill.

ISSN

0273-5024

eISSN

1543-2769

Language

English

Issue

2

Publisher

Human Kinetics