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Impact of supervised student optometry consultations on the patient experience

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Version 2 2024-06-13, 16:21
Version 1 2018-05-31, 09:03
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 16:21 authored by SA Bentley, JE Trevaskis, CA Woods, D Guest, KG Watt
Background: Understanding patient perceptions of having students involved in their clinical care is important as we strive to develop optimal models of care that integrate teaching with the best possible experience for the patient. The aim was to ascertain the impact of supervised optometry student consultations on the patient experience. Methods: A survey comprising 45 questions was mailed to consecutive adult patients who had undergone a comprehensive eye examination at the Australian College of Optometry over a four-week period. Results: Responses were received from 193 patients who had a student involved in their care (44 per cent response rate; 156 completed correctly) and 177 who did not have a student involved (32 per cent response rate; 105 completed correctly). There was no significant difference in overall patient satisfaction between the teaching and non-teaching clinics (p = 0.18). Over 87 per cent of patients in the teaching clinic felt completely comfortable with a student examining them, 44 per cent felt their care was better because a student was involved and 97 per cent rated the overall performance of the student as very good or good. Although 12 per cent would rather have seen only the optometrist and three per cent would not be happy to have a student involved in their eye care again, 100 per cent believed it is important for students to work with patients. The most common reason for student acceptance was the importance of students needing opportunities to learn. The main reasons for unwillingness to have a student involved in future were the additional time taken and prolonged testing. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that most patients view supervised student involvement in their optometric care as an important and highly positive experience. However, efforts should be made to avoid excessively long consultations and prolonged testing. Concerns about patient satisfaction and acceptance are largely unwarranted and should not prevent optometry students being involved in patient care.

History

Journal

Clinical and experimental optometry

Volume

101

Pagination

288-296

Location

Chichester, Eng.

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

0816-4622

eISSN

1444-0938

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2017, Optometry Australia

Issue

2

Publisher

John Wiley & Sons

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