File(s) under permanent embargo

Improving laboratory learning

journal contribution
posted on 2016-02-01, 00:00 authored by Kieran LimKieran Lim
It has been most encouraging to see science (and innovation)
at the forefront of Australian domestic politics in recent
months. It is also reassuring to see broader bipartisan
agreement from the major political parties on the importance of
science and research to the nation’s future. Governments may
choose to prioritise the areas of scientific endeavour that
warrant greater support but the acknowledgement by our
political leaders (federal and state) that science and innovation
is vital for the nation’s future has not always been forthcoming.
The funding mechanisms (e.g. grant schemes) and business
incentives (e.g. taxation) put in place by governments are
important catalysts of ideally spontaneous processes leading to
innovation and economic advances. However, this pathway is
very complicated.

History

Journal

Chemistry in Australia

Volume

2016

Issue

February

Pagination

36 - 36

Publisher

Royal Australian Chemical Institute

Location

Melbourne, Vic.

ISSN

0314-4240

eISSN

1839-2539

Language

eng

Grant ID

RM26857

Publication classification

C Journal article; C3 Non-refereed articles in a professional journal

Copyright notice

2016, Royal Australian Chemical Institute