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Increased receptor binding of low-density lipoprotein from individuals consuming a high-carbohydrate, low-saturated-fat diet.

Version 2 2024-06-13, 10:47
Version 1 2017-07-26, 11:42
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 10:47 authored by H Hara, WG Abbott, L Patti, G Ruotolo, BA Swinburn, RM Fields, S Kataoka, BV Howard
The substitution of saturated fat by complex carbohydrate, according to current dietary recommendations, results in a decrease of plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. To determine whether this decrease might result from structural and thus functional changes in LDL particles, the binding internalization and degradation of 125I-LDL were measured using TR715-19 cells, a mutant CHO line into which has been transfected the human LDL receptor, and in which measurements of binding are highly reproducible. Eleven nondiabetic subjects (35 +/- 4 years, 27% +/- 3% body fat) were studied after they had 15% protein, and 560 mg cholesterol/d and the other containing 21% fat (6% saturated), 65% carbohydrate, 14% protein, and 524 mg cholesterol/d.LDL cholesterol levels decreased form 125 +/- 6 to 108 +/- 5 mg/dl (P < .01) on the high-carbohydrate diet. There was an increase in the binding affinity of LDL (Kd 6.6 +/- 2.6 v 7.3 +/- 2.7 micrograms/mL +/- SD; P < .02), and internalization (P < .10), and degradation (P < .05) were also higher. The data suggest that decreasing dietary saturated fat may cause alterations in LDL composition that result in increased receptor clearance; this may partially explain the LDL-decreasing effect of this dietary change.

History

Journal

Metabolism

Volume

41

Pagination

1154-1160

Location

United States

ISSN

0026-0495

Language

eng

Publication classification

CN.1 Other journal article

Issue

11

Publisher

WB Saunders