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Influence of sprint training on human skeletal muscle purine nucleotide metabolism

Version 2 2024-06-03, 09:01
Version 1 2017-05-11, 13:58
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 09:01 authored by CG Stathis, MA Febbraio, MF Carey, Rod SnowRod Snow
To examine the effect of sprint training on human skeletal muscle purine nucleotide metabolism, eight active untrained subjects completed a maximal 30-s sprint bout on a cycle ergometer before and after 7 wk of sprint training. Resting muscle ATP and total adenine nucleotide content were reduced (P < 0.05) by 19 and 18%, respectively, after training. Training resulted in a 52% attenuation (P < 0.05) in the magnitude of ATP depletion after exercise and a similar reduction (P < 0.05) in the accumulation of inosine 5'-monophosphate and ammonia. During recovery, muscle inosine 5'-monophosphate (P < 0.05) and inosine (P < 0.01) content were reduced after training, as was the accumulation of inosine (P < 0.05). Plasma ammonia was higher (P < 0.05) after training early in recovery; in contrast, plasma hypoxanthine concentrations were reduced (P < 0.05) during the latter stages of recovery. The attenuated resting ATP and total adenine nucleotide contents after training probably result from the acute effects of prior training sessions. The reduction in the magnitude of ATP depletion during a 30-s sprint bout after training must reflect an improved balance between ATP hydrolysis and resynthesis. It is unclear which mechanism(s) is responsible for the reduction in the magnitude of ATP degradation after training.

History

Journal

Journal of Applied Physiology

Volume

76

Pagination

1802-1809

Location

Bethesda, Md.

ISSN

8750-7587

eISSN

1522-1601

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

1994, American Physiological Society

Issue

4

Publisher

American Physiological Society