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Insights into children's independent mobility for transportation cycling—which socio-ecological factors matter?

Version 2 2024-06-13, 17:05
Version 1 2017-04-03, 15:56
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 17:05 authored by A Ghekiere, B Deforche, A Carver, L Mertens, B de Geus, P Clarys, G Cardon, I De Bourdeaudhuij, J Van Cauwenberg
OBJECTIVES: To assess the associations of socio-ecological factors with independent mobility for transportation cycling among 10-to-12-year-old boys and girls. Additionally, we examined whether associations differed across family socio-economic status (SES) and urbanization level. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. METHODS: Parents (n=1286) were recruited via 45 primary schools across Flanders, Belgium. They completed an online questionnaire assessing demographic and psychosocial factors, neighborhood environmental perceptions, as well as some characteristics of their child. Independent mobility was assessed as the distance children were allowed to cycle for transport without adult supervision. Multilevel gamma regression analyses stratified by gender were performed to examine the associations between the independent variables and children's independent mobility and the moderating effects of family SES and urbanization level. RESULTS: Independent mobility was higher among boys compared to girls. Perception of children's cycling and traffic skills and children's grade were positively associated with independent mobility among boys and girls. Perceptions of neighborhood traffic safety were positively associated with independent mobility among girls, but not among boys. Perceptions of cycling skills were positively associated with independent mobility among boys living in high urbanized areas, but not in low urbanized areas. Parental cycling for transport was negatively associated with independent mobility among girls with a low family SES, but not among girls with a high family SES. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that interventions targeting increases in children's cycling and traffic skills may be effective to increase independent mobility. Few differences in associations were found according to children's gender, family SES or urbanization level.

History

Journal

Journal of science and medicine in sport

Volume

20

Pagination

267-272

Location

Chatswood, N.S.W.

ISSN

1440-2440

eISSN

1878-1861

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2016, Sports Medicine Australia

Issue

3

Publisher

Elsevier