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Interpersonal discrimination and markers of adiposity in longitudinal studies: a systematic review

Version 2 2024-06-03, 15:00
Version 1 2017-06-07, 11:19
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 15:00 authored by CDO Bernardo, JL Bastos, DA González-Chica, MA Peres, Yin ParadiesYin Paradies
While the impact of interpersonal discrimination on mental health is well established, its effects on physical health outcomes have not been fully elucidated. This study systematically reviewed the literature on the prospective association between interpersonal discrimination and markers of adiposity. Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, PsycInfo, SciELO, LILACS, Google Scholar, Capes/Brazil and ProQuest databases were used to retrieve relevant information in November 2016. The results from the 10 studies that met the inclusion criteria support an association between interpersonal self-reported discrimination and the outcomes. In general, the most consistent findings were for weight and body mass index (BMI) among women, i.e. high levels of self-reported discrimination were related to increased weight and BMI. Waist circumference (WC) showed a similar pattern of association with discrimination, in a positive direction, but an inverted U-shaped association was also found. Despite a few inverse associations between discrimination and markers of adiposity, none of the associations were statistically significant. Overall, markers of adiposity were consistently associated with discrimination, mainly through direct and nonlinear associations. This review provides evidence that self-reported discrimination can play an important role in weight, BMI and WC changes.

History

Journal

Obesity Reviews

Volume

18

Pagination

1040-1049

Location

England

ISSN

1467-7881

eISSN

1467-789X

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2017, World Obesity Federation

Issue

9

Publisher

WILEY