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Is having a 20-minute neighbourhood associated with eating out behaviours and takeaway home delivery? A cross-sectional analysis of ProjectPLAN

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Version 2 2024-06-03, 13:54
Version 1 2022-02-17, 08:34
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 13:54 authored by LH Oostenbach, KE Lamb, Lukar ThorntonLukar Thornton
Background: Through improved service provision and accessibility, 20-min neighbourhoods (20MNs) aim to enable people to meet most of their daily (non-work) needs within 20 min from home. Associations between 20MNs and food practices remain unknown. This study examines links with the frequency and location of eating out behaviours as well as the frequency of home food delivery. Methods: This cross-sectional study used data from 769 adults from the Places and Locations for Activity and Nutrition study (ProjectPLAN) conducted in Melbourne and Adelaide, Australia, between 2018 and 2019. Outcomes were 1) visit frequency to i) cafés, ii) restaurants, bars or bistros, iii) major chain fast food outlets and iv) takeaway outlets to purchase food; 2) total number of different types of out-of-home food outlets visited; 3) use frequency of home food delivery services; 4) distance from home to the most frequented out-of-home food outlets. Exposure was whether participants had a 20MN (areas with high service/amenity provision) or a non-20MN (areas with low service/amenity provision). Ordinal regression models were fitted for the frequency outcomes. Poisson regression models were fitted for the number of different outlet types. Linear and spatial regression models were fitted for the distance outcomes. Results: Results suggested no differences in frequency of visitations to out-of-home food outlets and use of food delivery services between those with a 20MN and those with a non-20MN. Yet, those with a 20MN were more likely to use a greater number of different types of outlets on a weekly basis. Where a regular eating out location was reported, it was nearer to home for those with a 20MN. Conclusions: This study provides evidence supportive of 20MNs potentially facilitating more localised food practices, however, 20MNs may also encourage greater cumulative frequency of meals out across a variety of out-of-home food providers.

History

Journal

BMC Public Health

Volume

22

Article number

191

Pagination

1-12

Location

London, England

ISSN

1471-2458

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

1

Publisher

BioMed Central

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