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Ischaemic heart disease and Australian immigrants: the influence of birthplace and language skills on treatment and use of health services

Version 2 2024-06-13, 07:45
Version 1 2014-10-27, 16:43
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 07:45 authored by A Renzaho
Admission rates for ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and the use of invasive cardiovascular procedures, separation mode and length of stay (LOS) were compared between Australians from non-English speaking background (NESB; n=8627) and English speaking background (ESB; n=13162) aged 20 years and over admitted to Victorian urban public hospitals. The study covered the period from 1993 to 1998. It was found that, compared with their ESB counterparts, the incidence of admission for acute myocardial infarction was significantly higher for NESB men and women before and after controlling for confounding factors. The age-adjusted ratios for NESB women compared with their ESB counterparts ranged from 1.23 to 1.89 for cardiac catheterisation, from 0.23 to 0.27 for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), and from 1.04 to 1.80 for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).
Procedure rates were comparable in men for cardiac catheterisation and CABG but higher for PTA rates in NESB men (OR: 1.29, 95%CI: 1.11-1.50) than their ESB counterparts. Both NESB men (β=0.04, 95%CI: 0.01-0.07) and women (β=0.03, 95%CI: 0.02-0.08) experienced significantly longer hospital stays than their ESB counterparts. These findings indicate there may be systematic differences in patients’ treatment and service utilisation in Victorian public hospitals. The extent to which physicians’ bias and
patients’ choice could explain these differences requires further investigation.

History

Journal

Health information management journal

Volume

36

Pagination

26-36

Location

Sydney, NSW

ISSN

1833-3583

eISSN

1833-3575

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

2

Publisher

Health Information Management Association of Australia