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Law, religion and public order in colonial India: contextualising the 1887 Allahabad High Court case on 'sacred' cows

journal contribution
posted on 2010-01-01, 00:00 authored by Matthew GrovesMatthew Groves
Matthew Groves focuses on law, religion and public order in Colonial India in the context of the 1887 Allahabad High Court case on 'Sacred' Cows. The drama and political ramifications of the cow riots and the light that they throw on the subterranean world of nineteenth-century Hindu society have made them a natural target for scholarly inquiry. The 'holy cow' is such a modern Indian icon that most people assume the animal has always been sacred to Hindus. Muslims, by contrast, have always been meat-eaters and beef has been a staple of the Indian Muslim diet since the Arab conquest of Sind in the early eighth century. The Code of Civil Procedure, the Indian Penal Code, and the Code of Criminal Procedure were all enacted within three years of the transfer of power, prompting Law Member James Stephen to reflect in a minute of 1872.

History

Journal

South Asia: journal of South Asia studies

Volume

33

Issue

1

Pagination

87 - 121

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Location

Abingdon, Eng.

ISSN

0085-6401

eISSN

1479-0270

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2010, South Asian Studies Association of Australia