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Learning skills : robotics technology in automotive powertrain assembly

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journal contribution
posted on 2004-01-01, 00:00 authored by H Zhang, Z Gan, T Brogard, J Wang, Mats Isaksson
The past 40 years have seen industrial robots establish their superiority over humans in most areas of manufacturing requiring endurance or repeatability. One important application domain, however, has so far lagged behind the industry’s expectations: mechanical assembly. As fast, precise and dependable as they are, traditional industrial robots just don’t seem able to perform certain assembly operations as well as a skilled human worker. A task as simple as screwing a light bulb into a lamp socket shows why. Applying the right amount of force and turning the bulb at just the right time, at exactly the right angle, is something a human does intuitively. How can a robot be programmed to do this? For robots to successfully emulate humans on an assembly line, they need to have force-sensing capability and exhibit compliance. They must be able to direct forces and moments in a controlled way, and react to contact information. New robot force control technology from ABB shows how.

History

Journal

ABB review

Volume

1

Pagination

13 - 16

Publisher

A B B Corporate Management Services AG

Location

Zurich, Switzerland

ISSN

1013-3119

Language

Eng

Publication classification

C3.1 Non-refereed articles in a professional journal

Copyright notice

2004, ABB Corporate Management Services AG

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