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Longitudinal associations between adult-supervised drinking during adolescence and alcohol misuse from ages 25–31 years: A comparison of Australia and the United States

journal contribution
posted on 2024-03-06, 05:38 authored by JA Bailey, VT Le, BJ McMorris, GJ Merrin, JA Heerde, EA Batmaz, John ToumbourouJohn Toumbourou
Prior studies suggest that adult supervised drinking in adolescence predicts greater adolescent alcohol misuse. Long-term follow up data examining how adult supervised drinking during adolescence relates to alcohol misuse in adulthood are lacking. Longitudinal data from the International Youth Development Study tested associations between adult supervised drinking during adolescence (ages 13–16; 2002–2004) and adult alcohol misuse (ages 25–31; 2014, 2018, 2020). Cross-nationally matched samples were compared in Washington State, USA (n = 961) and Victoria, Australia (n = 1,957; total N = 2,918, 55 % female, 83 % White), where adult-supervised adolescent alcohol use was more common. Multilevel analyses adjusted for state, sex, adolescent drinking, parent education, family management, family history of substance use problems, and parent alcohol-related norms. Adult supervised drinking in adolescence (at dinner or parties, on holidays) predicted more adult alcohol misuse (mean Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score; b[SE] 0.07[0.03]; p = 0.004) and higher rates of alcohol-impaired driving (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.501, p = 0.034) and riding with an alcohol-impaired driver (OR 1.669, p = 0.005), but not the use of strategies to moderate alcohol intake (e.g., counting drinks). Better family management (monitoring, clear rules) in adolescence predicted less adult alcohol misuse. Associations were similar in the two states. Reducing the frequency of adult supervised drinking and improving family management practices in adolescence may help to decrease alcohol misuse well into adulthood. Findings support the widespread implementation of substance use prevention and family management training programs.

History

Journal

Addictive Behaviors

Volume

153

Article number

107984

Pagination

107984-107984

Location

England

ISSN

0306-4603

eISSN

1873-6327

Language

en

Publisher

Elsevier BV