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Longitudinal associations between infant movement behaviours and development

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journal contribution
posted on 01.12.2022, 00:00 authored by Valerie Carson, Z Zhang, M Predy, L Pritchard, Kylie HeskethKylie Hesketh
Abstract
Background
This study aimed to address methodological limitations of the evidence that informed national and international movement behaviour guidelines for the early years. Specifically, the primary objective was to examine the longitudinal associations of infant physical activity (i.e., tummy time) and sedentary behaviour (i.e., back time, screen time, reading time, restrained time) with gross motor development. Secondary and tertiary objectives were to examine longitudinal associations of: (1) infant physical activity and sedentary behaviour with communication, fine motor, personal-social, and problem solving development, and (2) sleep time with primary and secondary outcomes.

Methods
Participants were 411 parents and their infants from the Early Movers project in Edmonton, Canada. Physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and sleep were measured with a parental questionnaire and the Ages & Stages Questionnaire (ASQ-3) developmental screening tool was administered at 2, 4, and 6 months. Parents reported the dates six major gross motor milestones (i.e., independent sitting, crawling, assisted standing, assisted walking, independent standing, independent walking) were acquired in the first 18 months of life according to World Health Organization criteria. In a subsample (n = 125), gross motor development was assessed using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) at 6 months.

Results
Higher tummy time across time points was significantly associated with higher ASQ-3 gross motor and personal-social development scores over time, higher total AIMS scores at 6 months, and earlier acquisition of all gross motor milestones. Higher reading time across time points was significantly associated with higher ASQ-3 fine motor, gross motor, personal-social, and total development scores over time. In contrast, higher back time across time points was significantly associated with lower total AIMS scores at 6 months and the later acquisition of assisted standing, assisted walking, and independent walking. Similarly, higher restrained time across time points was significantly associated with a later acquisition of supported walking.

Conclusions
Tummy time was consistently longitudinally associated with more advanced gross motor development and reading with more advanced total development. Whereas, some detrimental associations were observed for back and restrained time. Findings support the promotion of tummy time and certain sedentary behaviours (i.e., reading) in young infants to enhance overall development.

History

Journal

International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity

Volume

19

Issue

1

Article number

ARTN 10

Publisher

BMC

Location

England

ISSN

1479-5868

eISSN

1479-5868

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal