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Manufacturing influence on the delamination fracture behavior of the T800H/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

Version 2 2024-06-13, 07:45
Version 1 2014-10-27, 16:43
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 07:45 authored by J Zhang, B Fox
'Torayca' T800H/3900-2 is the first material qualified on Boeing Material Specification (BMS 8-276) which utilizes the thermoplastic-particulate interlayer toughening technology. Two manufacturing processes, the autoclave process and the fast heating rated Quickstep™ process, were employed to cure this material. The Quickstep process is a unique composite production technology which utilizes the fast heat transfer rate of fluid to heat and cure polymer composite components. The manufacturing influence on the mode I delamination fracture toughness of laminates was investigated by performing double cantilever beam tests. The composite specimens fabricated by two processes exhibited dissimilar delamination resistance curves (R-curves) under mode I loading. The initial value of fracture toughness GIC-INIT was 564 J/m2 for the autoclave specimens and 527 J/m2 for the Quickstep specimens. However, the average propagation fracture toughness GIC-PROP was 783 J/m2 for the Quickstep specimens, which was 2.6 times of that for the autoclave specimens. The mechanism of fracture occurred during delamination was studied under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Three types of fracture were observed: the interlayer fracture, the interface fracture, and the intralaminar fracture. These three types of fracture played different roles in affecting the delamination resistance curves during the crack growth. More fiber bridging was found in the process of delamination for the Quickstep specimens. Better fiber/matrix adhesion was found in the Quickstep specimens by conducting indentation-debond tests.

History

Journal

Materials & manufacturing processes

Volume

22

Pagination

768-772

Location

United States

ISSN

1042-6914

eISSN

1532-2475

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2007, Taylor & Francis

Issue

6

Publisher

Taylor & Francis Inc