Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Measuring cognitive insight in people with problematic substance use: an exploration of the factor validity of the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale

Version 2 2024-06-06, 02:55
Version 1 2019-08-05, 08:25
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-06, 02:55 authored by D Raftery, PJ Kelly, FP Deane, R Mcketin, AL Baker, Alyna TurnerAlyna Turner, Olivia DeanOlivia Dean
© 2019 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: Insight is a multi-dimensional construct that predicts treatment outcomes of people with mental illness. Research into insight in substance dependent populations is limited and measures of cognitive insight have not been validated for this population. Design and Methods: A cross sectional survey was conducted with residents of nine residential substance dependence treatment facilities in Australia. Cognitive insight was assessed using the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS). Psychological distress was assessed using the Kessler 6 (K6). Results: Participants (N = 312) were primarily male (68.6%), with an average age of 37.51 years (SD = 9.85). Methamphetamine (45.2%) and alcohol (35.9%) were the primary substances of use. A confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the two-factor model of the BCIS (CMIN/DF = 2.91, CFI = 0.84). Removing two items from the Self-Reflection subscale improved model fit (CMIN/DF = 2.71, CFI = 0.84, Χ 2[22, n = 312] = 76.43, P < 0.02). Internal consistency analyses indicated acceptable internal reliability (Self-Reflection α = 0.73, Self-Certainty α = 0.72, composite α = 0.75). Self-Certainty scores were significantly higher for participants with a self-reported psychotic disorder (M = 14.95 vs. M = 13.04, P = 0.007). Self-Reflection scores were higher for people experiencing psychological distress (M = 17.57 vs. M = 15.95, P = 0.001). Discussion and Conclusions: We found that a 12-item version of the BCIS had good psychometric properties in this substance-using population. Further research is needed to explore whether insight can predict treatment outcomes for substance use.

History

Journal

Drug and alcohol review

Volume

38

Pagination

622-629

Location

Chichester, Eng.

ISSN

0959-5236

eISSN

1465-3362

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2019, Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs

Issue

6

Publisher

Wiley

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC