File(s) under permanent embargo

Mediators of the relationship between sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms amongst disadvantaged women

Statement of problem: Associations between sedentary behavior (e.g. time spent sitting watching TV/using the computer) and physical health have been well documented, however, studies are increasingly reporting a positive relationship between certain sedentary behaviors and poor mental health (e.g. depression). Little is known about the underlying factors that may explain the link between sedentary behavior and likelihood of depression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of selected intra-personal and social factors as potential mediators of the relationship between sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms among women from disadvantaged neighborhoods. Method: Cross-sectional survey data were provided by 4065 women (aged 18–45) living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Women self-reported their sedentary behavior (total sitting time and screen time), depressive symptoms (CES-D 10), as well as a number of intra-personal (leisure-time physical activity, diet quality, weight status) and social (social cohesion, interpersonal trust, club membership) factors. Results: Mediating analyses, controlling for confounders, showed that women's leisure-time physical activity partly mediated the relationship between total sitting time and increased likelihood of depressive symptoms. Women's diet quality, and social cohesion partly mediated the relationship between screen time and increased likelihood of depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Acknowledging the cross-sectional study design, findings suggest that there may be several factors that explain the increased likelihood of depressive symptoms associated with greater sedentary time. Although future studies should test the mediating relationships longitudinally, these findings may help inform interventions aimed at reducing the likelihood of depression in disadvantaged women with high sitting time.

History

Journal

Mental health and physical activity

Volume

7

Issue

1

Pagination

30 - 36

Publisher

Elsevier

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ISSN

1755-2966

eISSN

1878-0199

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2014, Elsevier