File(s) under permanent embargo

Mental reinstatement of context with child witnesses : does it matter whether context is reinstated 'out loud'?

journal contribution
posted on 01.06.2010, 00:00 authored by Paul Dietze, Martine Powell, Don ThomsonDon Thomson
In this study we examined the impact of two types of mental reinstatement of context instructions in facilitating children's recall of a staged event across two stages of development. Specifically, a 2 times 3 factorial design was utilised incorporating two age groups (6- and 12-year-olds) and three interview conditions (standard recall, mental reinstatement where the child was instructed to reinstate the context 'out loud', and mental reinstatement without the explicit 'out loud' instruction). Overall, mental reinstatement instruction led to more correct and fewer incorrect responses than the standard recall instruction. The effect of mental reinstatement was similar across the age groups and irrespective of whether the child was asked to reinstate 'out loud'. Beneficial effects of the technique, however, were only evident for cued-recall questions as opposed to free-narrative responses. The implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.

History

Journal

Psychology crime and law

Volume

16

Issue

5

Pagination

439 - 448

Publisher

Routledge

Location

Basingstoke, England

ISSN

1068-316X

eISSN

1477-2744

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2010, Taylor & Francis