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Modulation of brain angiotensin-converting enzyme by dietary sodium and chronic intravenous and intracerebroventricular fusion of angiotensin II

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Version 2 2024-06-17, 13:42
Version 1 2015-08-14, 12:29
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-17, 13:42 authored by FA Mendelsohn, J Csicsmann, JS Hutchinson, R DiNicolantonio, Y Takata
Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat brain closely resembled that in lung in its kinetics with the substrate Hip-His Leu, the inhibitors SQ 20,881 and SQ 14,225, and iun its Cl- activation profile. Modification of dietary NaCl intake was associated with marked changes in brain ACE activity. Sodium-loaded rats had lower activity of ACE in hypothalamus, striatum, and midbrain, and higher activity in spinal cord compared to controls. In sodium-restricted rats, ACE was elevated in pituitary and depressed in spinal cord. Chronic intravenous infusion of angiotensin (AII) was associated with a pattern of changes partly resembling sodium loading: ACE was depressed in hypothalamus and striatum but elevated in midbrain. After chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of AII, ACE was elevated in striatum and hippocampus, and depressed in spinal cord; a pattern of changes quite different from those associated with intravenous AII. These results show that ACE in several brain regions is sensitive to dietary sodium intake and support the hypothesis that angiotensin-containing neurons in these areas might be responsive to NaCl status of the animal. The observed changes in brain ACE do not seem to be explained in any simple manner by changes in circulating or central angiotensin II.

History

Journal

Hypertension

Volume

4

Pagination

590-596

Location

United States

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

0194-911X

Language

eng

Publication classification

CN.1 Other journal article

Issue

5

Publisher

American Heart Association