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Morphology of the anterior cingulate cortex in young men at ultra-high risk of developing a psychotic illness

Version 2 2024-06-05, 11:30
Version 1 2021-05-12, 15:59
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-05, 11:30 authored by M Yücel, SJ Wood, LJ Phillips, GW Stuart, DJ Smith, Alison YungAlison Yung, D Velakoulis, PD McGorry, C Pantelis
BackgroundThe anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is consistently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and our own work has identified morphological anomalies in the ACC of people with this disorder.AimsTo examine whether ACC morphological anomalies are present in a group at ultra-high risk of psychosis and whether such anomalies can be used to predict the subsequent development of a psychotic illness.MethodMagnetic resonance imaging of 75 healthy volunteers and 63 people at ultra-high risk of developing a psychotic disorder (all right-handed males) was used to examine ACC sulcal and gyral features.ResultsCompared with the controls, significantly fewer people in the ultra-high risk group had a well-developed left paracingulate sulcus and significantly more had an interrupted left cingulate sulcus. There was no difference between those who did (n=21) and did not (n=42) subsequently develop a psychotic illness.ConclusionsAlthough ACC anomalies are present in young people considered to be at ultra-high risk of psychosis, they do not identify individuals who subsequently make the transition to psychosis.

History

Journal

British Journal of Psychiatry

Volume

182

Pagination

518-524

Location

England

ISSN

0007-1250

eISSN

1472-1465

Language

English

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

JUNE

Publisher

ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS

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