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Movement intensity demands between training activities and competition for elite female netballers

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posted on 07.04.2021, 00:00 authored by Edward Brooks, A C Benson, Aaron FoxAaron Fox, Lyndell BruceLyndell Bruce
The aim of this study was to assess the differences in movement intensity demands between training activities and competition match-play in elite netball. Twelve elite female netballers (mean ± SD, age = 25.9 ± 5.1 years; height = 178.6 ± 8.9 cm, body mass = 71.1 ± 7.1 kg) competing in Australia’s premier domestic netball competition participated. Data were collected across the season from all pre-season training sessions (n = 29), pre-season practice matches (n = 8), in-season training sessions (n = 21), in-season practice matches (n = 5), and competition matches (n = 15). Linear mixed-effects models assessed differences in PlayerLoad™ per minute and metreage per minute between activity types (Specialist, Skill Drills, Set-piece, Match Scenarios, Practice Match-play, and Competition Match-play) for positional groupings (Defenders, Midcourters, and Goalers). Competition Match-play resulted in higher (p < 0.05) PlayerLoad™ than all training activity types, with the largest magnitudes of difference between Specialist–Competition (d = 0.44–0.59; small to medium) and Skill Drills–Competition (d = 0.35–0.63; small to medium) for all positional groups. The smallest difference was found between Match Scenarios–Competition (d = 0.12–0.20; trivial to small) and Practice Match-play–Competition (d = 0.12–0.14; trivial). Competition Match-play also resulted in higher (p < 0.05) metreage per minute than Specialist (d = 0.23–0.53; small to medium), Skill Drills (d = 0.19–0.61; trivial to medium) and Set-piece (d = 0.05–0.31; trivial to small). Training activity demands in order of least to most similar to competition were specialist, skill drills, set-piece, match scenarios, and practice match-play. We provide data that enables coaches and physical preparation staff to incorporate progressions into their training session designs that can replicate the movement intensity demands of competition in training.

History

Journal

PLoS ONE

Volume

16

Issue

4

Article number

e0249679

Pagination

1 - 10

Publisher

Public Library of Science

Location

San Francisco, Calif.

ISSN

1932-6203

eISSN

1932-6203

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal