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Muscle strength and gait speed rather than lean mass are better indicators for poor cognitive function in older men

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journal contribution
posted on 25.06.2020, 00:00 authored by Sophia Sui, Kara KewKara Kew, Natalie HydeNatalie Hyde, Lana WilliamsLana Williams, S Leach, Julie PascoJulie Pasco
We aimed to examine muscle strength, function and mass in relation to cognition in older men. This cross-sectional data-set included 292 men aged ≥60 yr. Handgrip strength (kg) was measured by dynamometry, gait speed by 4-metre walk (m/s) and appendicular lean mass (kg) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Cognition was assessed across four domains: psychomotor function, attention, visual learning and working memory. Composite scores for overall cognition were calculated. Bivariate analyses indicated that handgrip strength and gait speed were positively associated with cognitive function. After accounting for confounders, positive associations between individual muscle (or physical) measures and cognitive performance were sustained for handgrip strength and psychomotor function, gait speed and psychomotor function, gait speed and attention, handgrip strength and overall cognition, and gait speed and overall cognition. In multivariable models, handgrip strength and gait speed independently predicted psychomotor function and overall cognition. No associations were detected between lean mass and cognition after adjusting for confounders. Thus, low muscle strength and slower gait speed, rather than low lean mass, were associated with poor cognition in older men.

History

Journal

Scientific Reports

Volume

10

Issue

1

Article number

10367

Pagination

1 - 9

Publisher

Nature Research

Location

Berlin, Germany

eISSN

2045-2322

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2020, The Author(s)