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Narrative practice may foster comfort but not enhance cognition in adult witness interviews about a mock sexual assault

journal contribution
posted on 02.09.2020, 00:00 authored by Sonja Brubacher, Stefanie SharmanStefanie Sharman, Nina J Westera, Hamida Zekiroski, Meaghan DanbyMeaghan Danby, Martine Powell
The present study tested the effectiveness of narrative practice on adult witnesses’ reports about a mock sexual assault. Narrative practice is a rapport-building activity that involves recounting a neutral or pleasant event prior to discussing the target topic. Engaging in narrative practice tends to enhance children’s reporting, but its utility with adults is unknown. Adults (n = 62) 18- to 62-years-old viewed a 7-minute video of a mock sexual assault and then were questioned with an open-ended protocol that began with narrative practice or not. Results showed that narrative practice did not appear to aid memory retrieval but may have increased comfort for some participants. Findings are discussed with regard to interviewing practice.

History

Journal

Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology

Volume

31

Issue

5

Pagination

814 - 821

Publisher

Routledge

Location

Abingdon, Eng.

ISSN

1478-9949

eISSN

1478-9957

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2020, Informa UK