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Negative perceptions about self-control and identification with gender-role stereotypes related to binge eating, problem drinking, and to co-morbidity among adolescents

journal contribution
posted on 2003-01-01, 00:00 authored by R Williams, L Ricciardelli
Purpose
To examine the role of both positive and negative styles of self-control, and gender-role stereotypes in binge eating and problem drinking.

Method
Participants were 428 adolescent boys and 555 girls from predominantly Anglo-Australian backgrounds who attended regional state schools in New South Wales, Australia. Students completed standardized questionnaires that assessed problem drinking, binge eating, self-control styles, and identification with gender-role stereotypes. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were conducted to examine differences among adolescents who reported problems in binge eating, drinking, and both domains.

Results
Adolescents who reported eating and drinking problems also reported a high negative and a low positive sense of self-control coupled with self-identification with the traits that typically describe negative dimensions of gender-role stereotypes. Regardless of gender, problem drinking was mainly related to traits of negative masculinity (bossy, noisy aggressive, etc.) whereas binge eating was mainly related to negative femininity (shy, needs approval from others, etc.). Participants who reported eating and drinking symptoms recorded low scores on positive control, high scores on negative control, and also high scores on the negative dimensions of masculinity and femininity.

Summary
A negative and passive style of self-control coupled with an identification with negative dimensions of gender summarizes the type of self-regulation that is implicated in both binge eating and problem drinking, and co-morbid symptoms. There is a need for interventions working toward a more balanced gender self-concept and a positive sense of self-control.

History

Journal

Journal of adolescent health

Volume

32

Issue

1

Pagination

66 - 72

Publisher

Elsevier Inc

Location

New York, N. Y.

ISSN

1054-139X

eISSN

1879-1972

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2003, Society for Adolescent Medicine