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Negative reactivity and parental warmth in early adolescence, and depressive symptoms in emerging adulthood

journal contribution
posted on 01.06.2017, 00:00 authored by B Lloyd, Jacqui MacdonaldJacqui Macdonald, George Youssef, Therese Knight, Primrose LetcherPrimrose Letcher, A Sanson, Craig OlssonCraig Olsson
Objective
Cross-sectional research suggests that relationships between temperamental negative reactivity and adolescent depressive symptoms may be moderated by parental warmth. The primary purpose of this study was to conduct the first prospective analysis of this relationship.
Method
Data from 1,147 families in an Australian population-based longitudinal study were used to examine: (1) temporal relationships between negative reactivity in early adolescence (13–14 years) and depressive symptoms in emerging adulthood (19–20 years); (2) the moderating role of parent-reported warmth in early adolescence (13–14 years); and (3) the moderating role of child gender. Hierarchical multiple regression was conducted to test the hypothesis that parental warmth would moderate the relationship between early adolescent negative reactivity and depressive symptoms in emerging adulthood.
Results
After accounting for previous depressive symptoms at age 13–14 years, negative reactivity was positively associated with later depressive symptoms. By contrast, parental warmth at 13–14 years was negatively associated with later depressive symptoms for females but not males. Parental warmth did not moderate the association between early adolescent negative reactivity and subsequent depressive symptoms.
Conclusions
This study was the first to use prospective data to assess the protective effects of early adolescent parental warmth on the association between negative reactive temperaments and early adult depressive symptoms. Findings suggest that parental warmth for negatively reactive children provides only concurrent protection against subsequent depressive risk. This study did not examine parent–child transactional models, which may, in future longitudinal research, improve understanding of how trajectories of parent–child goodness-of-fit contribute to depressive symptoms.

History

Journal

Australian journal of psychology

Volume

69

Issue

2

Pagination

121 - 129

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Location

Chichester, Eng.

ISSN

1742-9536

eISSN

1742-9536

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2016, Australian Psychological Society