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New insights into nickel-free superelastic titanium alloys for biomedical applications

Version 2 2024-06-05, 00:27
Version 1 2019-10-03, 08:57
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-05, 00:27 authored by A Ramezannejad, Wei XuWei Xu, WL Xiao, K Fox, D Liang, M Qian
Superelastic titanium (Ti) alloys are a group of unique functional metallic materials capable of recovering a substantial amount of mechanical strain thereby offering superior resilience. Such strain recovery is significantly greater than that exhibited by conventional elasticity and has been demonstrated to be clearly beneficial and necessary for a vast range of biomedical and dental applications. For example, the age-related physiological deterioration of bones signifies the necessity of employing superelastic implants. Currently, NiTi alloy remains to be the premier choice of superelastic alloys in the broad biomedical sector. However, recently reinforced views on the toxic, carcinogenic and allergenic properties of nickel have resulted in intensified concerns. This has encouraged the design and fabrication of Ni-free superelastic Ti alloys. In addition, enabled by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing, hierarchical micro-architectured lattice meta-materials can exhibit exceptional superelasticity without undergoing phase transformations, upending the conventional perception and unlocking brand-new pathways to exploiting metal superelasticity. This article discusses recent developments in Ni-free superelastic Ti alloys and the determining factors affecting their superelastic recoverable strain. The importance of implant superelasticity relative to the elastic and “superelastic” properties of human bones is examined. Also discussed are the advances in Ni-free Ti-based superelastic alloy design and superelasticity-demanding medical and dental applications. The impact of the AM-enabled micro-architectural design on the development of superelastic structures or superelastic meta-materials is deliberated. Future research priorities are suggested.

History

Journal

Current Opinion in Solid State and Materials Science

Volume

23

Article number

ARTN 100783

Pagination

1 - 25

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ISSN

1359-0286

eISSN

1879-0348

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal, C Journal article

Issue

6

Publisher

PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD