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Nosocomial bacterial infections in Victoria decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic

journal contribution
posted on 2023-03-27, 04:01 authored by TF Asgill, Douglas StupartDouglas Stupart
Background: A number of infection control interventions were implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic in order to reduce the spread of this virus. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if these interventions were associated with reduced nosocomial bacterial infections in Victoria, Australia. Methods: Observational data were obtained from the Victorian Healthcare Associated Infection Surveillance System (VICNISS) based on admitted hospital patients in two 6-month timeframes representing pandemic and pre-pandemic hospital practices. Data were collected for surgical site infections, Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia, Clostridioides difficile infection, and central line-associated bloodstream infections. Results: There was a significant reduction in the rates of S. aureus bacteraemia (0.74 infections/10, 000 bed days pre-pandemic vs. 0.53/10,000 bed days in the pandemic period [rate ratio 0.72, 95% CI 0.57–0.90]; p =.003) and in C. difficile infections (2.2 infections/10,000 bed days pre-pandemic vs. 0.86/10 000 bed days in the pandemic era [rate ratio 0.76, 95% C.I. 0.67–0.86]; p <.001). There was no change in the overall rate of surgical site infections or central line-associated infections however. Discussion: The increased emphasis on infection control and prevention strategies during the pandemic period was associated with reduced transmission of S. aureus and C. difficile infections within hospitals.

History

Journal

Journal of Infection Prevention

Pagination

175717742311593-175717742311593

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

1757-1774

eISSN

1757-1782

Language

en

Publisher

SAGE Publications

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