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Nurses’ advice regarding sterile or clean urinary drainage bags for individuals with a long-term Indwelling urinary catheter

Version 2 2024-06-13, 08:27
Version 1 2014-10-28, 09:44
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 08:27 authored by J Ostaszkiewicz, J Paterson
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify, compare, and explore advice nurses give to community-dwelling long-term indwelling catheter users on the use of sterile or clean urinary drainage bags, and to obtain information that would inform the design of a larger-scale international survey. SUBJECTS AND SETTINGS: A survey was targeted to nurse members of the International Continence Society (n = 130). Respondents (n = 28; 21.5%) included nurses from Australia, Canada, Belgium, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, who specialized in managing incontinence. METHODS: The project was conducted as a descriptive, exploratory pilot study. Respondents completed an online anonymous survey that was distributed by the International Continence Society. The survey instrument was designed by the investigators and comprised 14 questions with both fixed and open-ended response options. RESULTS: Most respondents in this survey advised indwelling catheter users to reuse their catheter bags (n = 15; 68%). Factors that influenced advice included concerns about the cost of catheter bags, an evaluation of the individual's infection risk, local and national policies, evidence-based guidelines, users' living arrangements, and their ability to clean the bags. Advice on decontamination methods varied; however, the most commonly recommended cleaning agent was water and vinegar, followed by a sterilizing or bleach solution or dishwashing detergent. CONCLUSION: Nurses play a key role in educating and supporting indwelling catheter users. Results of this study highlight variability in the advice nurses give to community-dwelling long-term indwelling catheter users about sterile or clean urinary drainage bags. This variability requires further investigation and affirms the need for a larger-scale study that draws on a broader sample of nurses.

History

Journal

Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing

Volume

39

Pagination

77-83

Location

Philadelphia, Pa.

ISSN

1071-5754

eISSN

1528-3976

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2012, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Issue

1

Publisher

2-s2.0-84856049205