Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Omega‐3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids as a potential treatment for reducing dysmenorrhoea pain: Systematic literature review and meta‐analysis

journal contribution
posted on 2023-08-16, 03:51 authored by Rhiannon SnipeRhiannon Snipe, Benjamin Brelis, Christina Kappas, Julie K Young, Lucy Eishold, Jie M Chui, Meher D Vatvani, Gabriella MD Nigro, D Lee Hamilton, Lilia Convit, Amelia Carr, Dominique Condo
AbstractAimThis systematic literature review with meta‐analysis aimed to determine the effect of omega‐3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on prostaglandin levels and pain severity in women with dysmenorrhoea and identify adverse side effects.MethodsA literature search was conducted in Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, MEDLINE complete, CINAHL and AMED databases (PROSPERO CRD42022340371). Included studies provided omega‐3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids compared to a control in women with dysmenorrhoea and reported pain and/or prostaglandin levels. A random effects meta‐analysis with Cohen's d effect size (95% confidence interval) was performed in SPPS for studies that reported pain outcomes. Study quality was assessed using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Criteria Checklist.ResultsTwelve studies (n = 881 dysmenorrhoeal women) of predominantly neutral quality (83%) were included that provided daily supplementation of 300–1800 mg omega‐3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids over 2 or 3 months. Meta‐analysis (n = 8 studies) showed a large effect of omega‐3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (d = −1.020, 95% confidence interval −1.53 to −0.51) at reducing dysmenorrhoea pain. No studies measured prostaglandin levels, 86% of studies measuring analgesic use showed a reduction with omega‐3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and few studies reported mild adverse side effects in individual participants.ConclusionsFindings suggest that daily supplementation of 300–1800 mg omega‐3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids over 2–3 months are generally well tolerated and reduces pain and analgesic use in women with dysmenorrhoea. However, the neutral quality of research is limited by methodological issues and the mechanism of action remains to be determined.

History

Journal

Nutrition & Dietetics

Pagination

1-13

Location

Australia

ISSN

1446-6368

eISSN

1747-0080

Language

en

Publisher

Wiley