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Optimal cut-points of different anthropometric indices and their joint effect in prediction of type 2 diabetes: results of a cohort study

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journal contribution
posted on 2018-01-01, 00:00 authored by N Zafari, Mojtaba Lotfaliany Abrand AbadiMojtaba Lotfaliany Abrand Abadi, M A Mansournia, D Khalili, F Azizi, F Hadaegh
Background:
To determine the anthropometric indices that would predict type 2 diabetes (T2D) and delineate their optimal cut-points.

Methods:
In a cohort study, 7017 Iranian adults, aged 20–60 years, free of T2D at baseline were investigated. Using Cox proportional hazard models, hazard ratios (HRs) for incident T2D per 1 SD change in body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist to height ratio (WHtR), waist to hip ratio (WHR), and hip circumference (HC) were calculated. The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves (AUC) was calculated to compare the discriminative power of anthropometric variables for incident T2D. Cut-points of each index were estimated by the maximum value of Youden’s index and fixing the sensitivity at 75%. Using the derived cut-points, joint effects of BMI and other obesity indices on T2D hazard were assessed.

Results:
During a median follow-up of 12 years, 354 men, and 490 women developed T2D. In both sexes, 1 SD increase in anthropometric variables showed significant association with incident T2D, except for HC in multivariate adjusted model in men. In both sexes, WHtR had the highest discriminatory power while HC had the lowest. The derived cut-points for BMI, WC, WHtR, WHR, and HC were 25.56 kg/m2, 89 cm, 0.52, 0.91, and 96 cm in men and 27.12 kg/m2, 87 cm, 0.56, 0.83, and 103 cm in women, respectively. Assessing joint effects of BMI and each of the obesity measures in the prediction of incident T2D showed that among both sexes, combined high values of obesity indices increase the specificity for the price of reduced sensitivity and positive predictive value.

Conclusions:
Our derived cut-points differ between both sexes and are different from other ethnicities.

History

Journal

BMC public health

Volume

18

Issue

1

Article number

691

Pagination

1 - 12

Publisher

BMC

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

1471-2458

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, The Authors