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Organizing forms in change management: the role of structures, process and boundaries in a longitudinal case analysis

journal contribution
posted on 2005-09-01, 00:00 authored by Fiona Graetz, Aaron Smith
This paper examines change management at William Angliss Institute of Technical and Further Education (TAFE) against the three organizational dimensions of structures, processes and boundaries identified by the INNFORM Study. Its experience confirms that even when an organization adopts a systemic approach and implements change across each design dimension, optimal performance benefits depend on mutually reinforcing and complementary changes. Furthermore, improvement to processes, particularly communications and human resources practices, plays a pivotal role, as complementary change across all dimensions depends ultimately on the contribution and commitment of organization members. Case findings also highlight the need for ambidextrous forms of organizing that combine 'controllability' with 'responsiveness'. The conceptual notion of organizing dualities has been employed to provide a practical interpretation of the ostensibly competing imperatives implied by ambidexterity. This case explores the dualities that can be demonstrated for the INNFORM triumvirate of structures, processes and boundaries. The dualities interpretation emphasizes an acceptance of texture and the simultaneous presence of what are conventionally viewed as incompatible organizing forms. This was considered a useful conceptual vehicle in the analysis of a case study covering nearly ten years of serious change interventions, where one theoretical view can be misleading in understanding the subtleties and complexities of the actual changes that occurred.

History

Journal

Journal of change management

Volume

5

Issue

3

Pagination

311 - 328

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Location

London, England

ISSN

1469-7017

eISSN

1479-1811

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2005, Taylor & Francis

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